Monthly Archives

20 Articles

Posted by .Ronald on

Gecko 1.8, Mozilla Firefox 1.1 and Mozilla Thunderbird 1.1 Release Plans

Asa Dotzler has posted a newsgroup message about the plans for the 1.8 release. As official Mozilla Application Suite development has ceased, the forthcoming Mozilla 1.8 Beta 2 release will be delivered as a set of alpha builds of Mozilla Firefox 1.1 and Mozilla Thunderbird 1.1. In preparation for the release of the alphas, the trunk will freeze at the midnight between Tuesday 5th April and Wednesday 6th April Pacific Daylight Time. During the freeze, only checkins approved by drivers@mozilla.org will be allowed to land. After the alphas come out, the tree will remain frozen until the Gecko 1.8 branch is created, which is likely to be in couple of months time. Broadly feature-complete betas of Firefox 1.1 and Thunderbird 1.1 will be released from the trunk in mid-May. A localisation freeze will come in to effect at this point, meaning that changes to strings used in the Firefox and Thunderbird user interfaces will not be allowed (this will let translators get an early start on localising the 1.1 versions). The final Firefox 1.1 and Thunderbird 1.1 releases will come from the 1.8 branch.

[Via mozillaZine]

Posted by .Ronald on

Gecko 1.8, Mozilla Firefox 1.1 and Mozilla Thunderbird 1.1 Release Plans

Asa Dotzler has posted a newsgroup message about the plans for the 1.8 release. As official Mozilla Application Suite development has ceased, the forthcoming Mozilla 1.8 Beta 2 release will be delivered as a set of alpha builds of Mozilla Firefox 1.1 and Mozilla Thunderbird 1.1. In preparation for the release of the alphas, the trunk will freeze at the midnight between Tuesday 5th April and Wednesday 6th April Pacific Daylight Time. During the freeze, only checkins approved by drivers@mozilla.org will be allowed to land. After the alphas come out, the tree will remain frozen until the Gecko 1.8 branch is created, which is likely to be in couple of months time. Broadly feature-complete betas of Firefox 1.1 and Thunderbird 1.1 will be released from the trunk in mid-May. A localisation freeze will come in to effect at this point, meaning that changes to strings used in the Firefox and Thunderbird user interfaces will not be allowed (this will let translators get an early start on localising the 1.1 versions). The final Firefox 1.1 and Thunderbird 1.1 releases will come from the 1.8 branch.

[Via mozillaZine]

Posted by .Ronald on

Gervase Markham: Greasemonkey

It’s good to see Greasemonkey getting some press. It’s a fantastic idea. I demoed something similar, although not as capable, at EuroFoo in August last year. I called it “refacing” – a way of changing the face of particular sites to suite yourself. My simple example was defacing the SCO website so that all the references read “SCOundrels”. (Amusingly, the current Word of The Day on the front of www.sco.com is “Longevity”. Presumably they are referring to Linux rather than their own business.) But I never had time to take it forward and it languishes still on my laptop. I’m glad someone is making this happen 🙂

You don’t actually need an extension to do something like Greasemonkey – you could do it all from a bookmarklet with appropriate server-side support. The bookmarklet injects a script which adds a DHTML popup to the page which gives a menu of available scripts. Of course, an extension gives much better UI, and is probably the correct solution for the long term.

However, the key problem with running scripts written by others in your session context for a website is security. There’s no real way to control a malicious user script once it’s running. Audit is your only line of defence. Be careful out there, kids.

[Via mozillaZine feedHouse]

Posted by .Ronald on

Gervase Markham: Greasemonkey

It’s good to see Greasemonkey getting some press. It’s a fantastic idea. I demoed something similar, although not as capable, at EuroFoo in August last year. I called it “refacing” – a way of changing the face of particular sites to suite yourself. My simple example was defacing the SCO website so that all the references read “SCOundrels”. (Amusingly, the current Word of The Day on the front of www.sco.com is “Longevity”. Presumably they are referring to Linux rather than their own business.) But I never had time to take it forward and it languishes still on my laptop. I’m glad someone is making this happen 🙂

You don’t actually need an extension to do something like Greasemonkey – you could do it all from a bookmarklet with appropriate server-side support. The bookmarklet injects a script which adds a DHTML popup to the page which gives a menu of available scripts. Of course, an extension gives much better UI, and is probably the correct solution for the long term.

However, the key problem with running scripts written by others in your session context for a website is security. There’s no real way to control a malicious user script once it’s running. Audit is your only line of defence. Be careful out there, kids.

[Via mozillaZine feedHouse]

Posted by .Ronald on

CNET News.com Reports on Greasemonkey

CNET News.com has an article about an extension for Mozilla Firefox called Greasemonkey. First released late last year, the Greasemonkey extension lets users install small pieces of JavaScript that change the behaviour or display of Web pages. These pieces of code, called user scripts, can be set to affect every page you visit or just those for a particular site. The extension comes preinstalled with a script that changes all underlined text on Web pages to italics (to avoid confusion with links) and one of the many site-specific Greasemonkey user scripts automatically changes the colours used on Slashdot. More advanced scripts are available too, including one that adds a persistent search feature to Gmail.

Read the full article here:
CNET News.com Reports on Greasemonkey

[Via mozillaZine]